7. Boosting Innovation & Growth Through University-Industry Co-Creation

Track conveners – Prof. Panayiotis H. KETIKIDIS, International Faculty of the University of Sheffield, CITY College, ketikidis@city.academic.gr,
and Dr. Devrim Göktepe-Hultén devrimgoktepe@gmail.com.

Innovation, entrepreneurship, and co-creation are key elements to bring the knowledge society to the next level in terms of emergence of new ideas (Perkmann et al., 2013), to accelerate changes and deliver impact and results (Etzkowitz, 2003; Johnson, 2009). The industry’s role in this process is crucial. As enterprises are mainly focused on economic performance, they need innovation to remain competitive in the markets they are active in or to become successful in the markets they want to enter. Universities have an equally important role to fulfil in the process. First of all, by investing – usually funded with public money – in fundamental research of which the results become available.

However, as the industry becomes the dynamic to the triple helix, it is of core importance to ensure a proper co-creation between industry and universities. Such co-creation should not be seen as an added value service, but rather, both universities and industries should incorporate such co-creation in their business models (Ketikidis et al, 2013; Carayannis et al., 2012). Understanding how this co-creation capitalizes becomes then a critical concern for both parties.

Topics include, but are not limited to:

University-Industry (U-I) co-creation capitalization/implementation forms
U-I co-creation case studies and best practices
Drivers and barriers to university-industry co-creation
Impact measurement of innovation outputs resulted from university-industry co-creation
Social engagement and social impact resulted from university-industry co-creation
Intermediaries and moderators of university-industry co-creation
U-I co-creation challenges for the quintuple helix (co-creation with society and environment)

References

Carayannis, E. G., Barth, T. D., & Campbell, D. F. (2012). The Quintuple Helix innovation model: global warming as a challenge and driver for innovation. Journal of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, 1(1): 1-12.
Etzkowitz, H. (2003). Research Groups as Quasi-firms: the Invention of the Entrepreneurial University. Research Policy; 32. 109-121.
Johnson, W. H. (2009). Intermediates in triple helix collaboration: The roles of 4th pillar organisations in public to private technology transfer. International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, 8(2-3): 142-158.
Ketikidis, P. H., Zaharis, N., Miariti, C., & Solomon, A. (2013). Building Capacity in South-East Europe: the Role of SEERC in Regional Development, The 2013 University-Industry Interaction Conference, 27-29 May, Amsterdam-Netherlands.
Perkmann, M., Tartari, V., McKelvey, M., Autio, E., Broström, A., D’Este, P., & Krabel, S. (2013). Academic engagement and commercialisation: A review of the literature on university–industry relations. Research Policy, 42(2): 423-442.